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December 15, 2012 1:46 pm
Stop Pasting The New Facebook Guidelines, It Is A Hoax

Like all others at around 9 A.M. I checked my Facebook account for the second time that morning and instead of weekend party photos, I was seeing a lengthy message being copied and pasted by every alternate guy and popping on my feed. I found some influential guys doing it and that is when I seriously thought I should not be missing out if it is an important news or development in the social or digital world.

But it took me 2 minutes to understand that this is spam and people are doing just Ctrl C & Ctrl V without even reading it. The message appears like the one pasted in the screen grab and I am sure by now you have either pasted it on your profile or have read someone blasting on his wall that please don’t post this rubbish on my news feed.

Read more at http://www.business2community.com/facebook/stop-pasting-the-new-facebook-guidelines-it-is-a-hoax-0341000#8quowAFp7Ht3Gup1.99 

November 9, 2012 10:05 pm
THE BIGGEST ‘BAIT N’ SWITCH’IN HISTORY?
It’s no conspiracy. Facebook acknowledged it as recently as last week: messages now reach, on average, just 15 percent of an account’s fans. In a wonderful coincidence, Facebook has rolled out a solution for this problem: Pay them for better access.
This has been brewing since around May. At least that’s when we first started noticing it here at Dangerous Minds and we certainly weren’t the only ones.
Spring of 2012 was when bloggers, non-profits, indie bands, George Takei, community theaters, photographers, caterers, artists, mega-churches, high schools, tee-shirt vendors, campus coffee shops, art galleries, museums, charities, food trucks, and a near infinite variety of organizations; individuals from all walks of life; and businesses, both large and small, began to detect—for it was almost imperceptible at first—that the volume was getting turned down on their Facebook reach. Each post was now being seen only by a fraction of their total “fans” who would previously have seen them.
But it wasn’t just the so-called “fan pages,” individual Facebook users were also starting to notice that they weren’t seeing much in their newsfeeds anymore from the various entities they “liked”—or even updates from their closest friends and family members. Something was amiss, but unless you had a larger “data set” to look at—or a formerly thriving online business that was now getting creamed—it probably wasn’t something that you noticed or paid that much attention to.

As their advertising head, Gokul Rajaram, explained, if you want to speak to the other 80 to 85 percent of people who signed up to hear from you, “sponsoring posts is important.”
In other words, through “Sponsored Stories,” brands, agencies and artists are now charged to reach their own fans—the whole reason for having a page—because those pages have suddenly stopped working.
This is a clear conflict of interest. The worse the platform performs, the more advertisers need to use Sponsored Stories. In a way, it means that Facebook is broken, on purpose, in order to extract more money from users. In the case of Sponsored Stories, it has meantraking in nearly $1M a day.

I love how Rajaram phrases that so delicately: “Sponsoring posts is important.”
Read entire article…

THE BIGGEST ‘BAIT N’ SWITCH’IN HISTORY?

It’s no conspiracy. Facebook acknowledged it as recently as last week: messages now reach, on average, just 15 percent of an account’s fans. In a wonderful coincidence, Facebook has rolled out a solution for this problem: Pay them for better access.

This has been brewing since around May. At least that’s when we first started noticing it here at Dangerous Minds and we certainly weren’t the only ones.

Spring of 2012 was when bloggers, non-profits, indie bands, George Takei, community theaters, photographers, caterers, artists, mega-churches, high schools, tee-shirt vendors, campus coffee shops, art galleries, museums, charities, food trucks, and a near infinite variety of organizations; individuals from all walks of life; and businesses, both large and small, began to detect—for it was almost imperceptible at first—that the volume was getting turned down on their Facebook reach. Each post was now being seen only by a fraction of their total “fans” who would previously have seen them.

But it wasn’t just the so-called “fan pages,” individual Facebook users were also starting to notice that they weren’t seeing much in their newsfeeds anymore from the various entities they “liked”—or even updates from their closest friends and family members. Something was amiss, but unless you had a larger “data set” to look at—or a formerly thriving online business that was now getting creamed—it probably wasn’t something that you noticed or paid that much attention to.

As their advertising head, Gokul Rajaram, explained, if you want to speak to the other 80 to 85 percent of people who signed up to hear from you, “sponsoring posts is important.”

In other words, through “Sponsored Stories,” brands, agencies and artists are now charged to reach their own fans—the whole reason for having a page—because those pages have suddenly stopped working.

This is a clear conflict of interest. The worse the platform performs, the more advertisers need to use Sponsored Stories. In a way, it means that Facebook is broken, on purpose, in order to extract more money from users. In the case of Sponsored Stories, it has meantraking in nearly $1M a day.

I love how Rajaram phrases that so delicately: “Sponsoring posts is important.”

Read entire article…

May 30, 2012 9:45 pm May 6, 2012 8:06 pm
Clicking ‘Like’ on Facebook Is Not Protected Speech, Judge Rules

NORFOLK, Va. (AP) — The “like” button on Facebook seems a relatively clear way to express your support for something, but a federal judge says that does not mean clicking it is constitutionally protected speech.

Exactly what a “like” means — if anything — played a part in a case in Virginia involving six people who say Sheriff B. J. Roberts of Hampton fired them for supporting an opponent in his 2009 re-election bid, which he won. The workers sued, saying their First Amendment rights were violated.

Sheriff Roberts said some of the workers were let go because he wanted to replace them with sworn deputies while others were dismissed because of poor performance or his belief that their actions “hindered the harmony and efficiency of the office.”

One of those workers, Daniel Ray Carter, had “liked” the Facebook page of Sheriff Roberts’s opponent, Jim Adams.

While public employees are allowed to speak as citizens on matters of public concern, Judge Raymond A. Jackson of Federal District Court ruled that clicking the “like” button did not amount to expressive speech. In other words, it was not the same as actually writing out a message and posting it on the site.

The case enters a murky legal area: previous cases have dealt with postings on social networks such as Facebook, but there are no actual words in this situation.

Marcus Messner, a journalism and mass communications professor at Virginia Commonwealth University who specializes in social media, said the matter would probably have to be settled by a higher court.

READ ENTIRE ARTICLE…

May 3, 2012 8:43 pm April 16, 2012 2:38 pm
After SOPA, PIPA, Why’s Facebook Liking CISPA? [UPDATED]

via  - AllFacebook

The Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act has a few things in common with the defeated Secure Online Information Privacy Act the Protect Internet Property Act besides rhyming acronyms, except that Facebook likes CISPA, despite very publicly hating SOPA and PIPA. 

Unfortunately, CISPA won’t enable Netflix to stream videos to U.S. customers on Facebook, which a precursor to SOPA and PIPA might have done if only the Senate hadn’t attempted to widen the scope of dropped a friendlier law passed by the House of Representatives last year.

Instead, CISPA, or H.R. 3523, tackles hacking, in the bad-guy sense of the term, not the white-hat wearing type that Facebook’s own corporate culture has made fashionable in all-night coding marathons.

The bill amends the National Security Act of 1947 to grant access to any data regarding a so-called cyber-threat to not just the government but also private security agencies.

This proposed law has the backing of both Democrats and Republicans alike, along with more than 100 companies support this bill, including Facebook. The social network wants the law to not require the disclosure of any information beyond what the company already shares — for instance, in the case of responding to subpoenas from from law enforcement.

The social network’s own Vice President of U.S. Public Policy, Joel Kapla, explained Facebook’s stance in a post about CISPA today:

April 14, 2012 6:40 pm
MARK ZUCKERBERG:  WHAT ARE YOU THINKING?
WE DEMAND YOU WITHDRAW FACEBOOK’S SUPPORT OF CISPA…THE BILL THAT THREATENS OUR INTERNET PRIVACY and puts every American Citizen at risk…
SIGN PETITION…

MARK ZUCKERBERG:  WHAT ARE YOU THINKING?

WE DEMAND YOU WITHDRAW FACEBOOK’S SUPPORT OF CISPA…THE BILL THAT THREATENS OUR INTERNET PRIVACY and puts every American Citizen at risk…

SIGN PETITION

April 13, 2012 5:12 pm
URGENT: Tell Facebook: "WE'RE FURIOUS: Withdraw Your Support For CISPA!" (the latest version of PIPA/SOPA)

What is Facebook thinking?  They’ve signed on in support of CISPA — the new bill that would obliterate online privacy, give the military crazy new abilities to spy on the Internet, and potentially let ISPs block sites and cut off users accused of piracy.

First, please help push this viral on Facebook by using this link — you’ll be sharing the campaign, along with the photo of Mark Zuckerberg at right:

If you’re already on Facebookclick here to share with your friends.

Then please sign on at right to add your name to our open letter.

The Center for Democracy and Technology says, CISPA has a very broad, almost unlimited definitionof the information that can be shared with government agencies and it supersedes all other privacy laws.”

According to the Electronic Frontier Foundation:

An ISP could even interpret this bill as allowing them to block accounts believed to be infringing,block access to websites like The Pirate Bay believed to carry infringing content, or take other measures provided they claimed it was motivated by cybersecurity concerns.

Internet users were able to push GoDaddy to withdraw its support of SOPA.  Now it’s time to make sure Facebook knows we’re furious.

PETITION TO MARK ZUCKERBERG: What is Facebook thinking?  You’re encouraging Congress to obliterate online privacy — Even as your users express increasing concern about the privacy of their accounts on your site.  Please withdraw your support for CISPA right away.

Please add your name to sign our open letter to Facebook.

Here’s CDT’s resource page on CISPA.  Here’s the EFF on IP implications.


March 31, 2012 7:21 pm
Senators Ask Feds To Probe Employer Requests for Facebook Passwords from Job Applicants

SEATTLE - Two U.S. senators are asking Attorney General Eric Holder to investigate whether employers asking for Facebook passwords during job interviews are violating federal law, their offices announced Sunday.

Troubled by reports of the practice, Democratic Sens. Chuck Schumer of New York and Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut said they are calling on the Department of Justice and the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission to launch investigations. The senators are sending letters to the heads of the agencies.

The Associated Press reported last week that some private and public agencies around the country are asking job seekers for their social media credentials. The practice has alarmed privacy advocates, but the legality of it remains murky.

On Friday, Facebook warned employers not to ask job applicants for their passwords to the site so they can poke around on their profiles. The company threatened legal action against applications that violate its long-standing policy against sharing passwords.

A Facebook executive cautioned that if an employer discovers that a job applicant is a member of a protected group, the employer may be vulnerable to claims of discrimination if it doesn’t hire that person.


Read more: http://www.myfoxla.com/dpp/news/local/senators-ask-feds-to-probe-requests-for-passwords-2012-03-26#ixzz1qeEv1qtP

March 29, 2012 1:37 pm
Up against the Wall! Should Minnesota district be allowed to demand a 12 yr old middle school girl's Facebook password?

A 12-year-old Minnesota girl was reduced to tears while school officials and a police officer rummaged through her private Facebook postings after forcing her to surrender her password, an ACLU lawsuit alleges. 

The claims are the latest in a string of tales showing that even password-protected, private online activities might not be safe from curious government agencies and schools. (See last week’s story)

The girl, whose identity is withheld in the lawsuit, came home “crying, depressed, angry, scared and embarrassed” after she was intimidated into divulging her login information by a school counselor and a deputy sheriff, who arrived in uniform, armed with a Taser, the lawsuit alleges.

"(The student now) fears that the school could make her give up her passwords at a moment’s notice, at any time, for any reason," the lawsuit claims.  It also alleges that password prying is standard practice at the Minnewaska Middle School, which the student still attends. "(Officials) have compelled other students to disclose their private information and have accessed students’ online accounts on multiple occasions," it states.


Officials at the Minnewaska Area School District — which is about 125 miles northwest of Minneapolis — say the ACLU’s version of events is “one-sided,” and that the school acted to “prevent disruption,” according to a statement e-mailed to msnbc.com by Superintendent Gregory Ohl. 

READ ENTIRE ARTICLE…

March 7, 2012 11:41 am

f="http://leftish.tumblr.com/post/18911010426/the-pope-who-i-love-im-not-knockin-the-pope-hes">"The Pope, who I love, I’m not knockin’ the Pope…he’s a fantastic Catholic celebrity. He is.

This is true: The Pope has a Facebook Page.  That’s true.  I’m not making that up.  The creepy thing is, under ‘Relationship Status’ he put, ‘It’s Complicated’…THAT’S the creepy thing!”

~ Bill Maher

March 6, 2012 7:56 pm
Could You Give up Google for a Day?

I’m glad Jennifer Collins tried this…now I know how impossible it would be for ME to do it!

I don’t know, it seems like it would be next to impossible to live in today’s world without being “tracked”…if not by Google, then by our Government…Even if you never use Google, or YouTube, or Gmail, or any of Google’s platforms, you can still be tracked when going onto sites of third parties who do use Google’s tools.

Sadly, I think there is no getting around the watchful eyes of Big Brother.

February 9, 2012 9:45 pm
Hey Everyone!
I’ve started a Facebook Page, BOYCOTT SUPERPACS!!
A unique and different approach to combating Citizens United and the Super-Pacs.
I’ve got some really good ideas for ways to accomplish that including:
Letter Writing Campaigns to Local Stations
Letters and Emails to the National Networks
Stage Rallies Outside the Networks, Candidates’ Offices & Ad Agencies responsible 
POSTER CAMPAIGN - Make printable flyers to post locally, listing companies to target
Generate Online Petitions and create a Facebook Page (BOYCOTT SUPERPACS) targeting National Networks
Letters, Emails and Online Petitions to the Candidates themselves
Publish names of Ad Agencies responsible for creating these ads
BOYCOTT PRODUCTS sold by any company funding SuperPacs (Koch Bros, for example).
Check out the page for greater details, photos and news articles about Citizens United, SuperPacs, and Politics.
Please have a look, and/or “Like” my page!

Hey Everyone!

I’ve started a Facebook Page, BOYCOTT SUPERPACS!!

A unique and different approach to combating Citizens United and the Super-Pacs.

I’ve got some really good ideas for ways to accomplish that including:

  1. Letter Writing Campaigns to Local Stations
  2. Letters and Emails to the National Networks
  3. Stage Rallies Outside the Networks, Candidates’ Offices & Ad Agencies responsible 
  4. POSTER CAMPAIGN - Make printable flyers to post locally, listing companies to target
  5. Generate Online Petitions and create a Facebook Page (BOYCOTT SUPERPACS) targeting National Networks
  6. Letters, Emails and Online Petitions to the Candidates themselves
  7. Publish names of Ad Agencies responsible for creating these ads
  8. BOYCOTT PRODUCTS sold by any company funding SuperPacs (Koch Bros, for example).

Check out the page for greater details, photos and news articles about Citizens United, SuperPacs, and Politics.

Please have a look, and/or “Like” my page!

December 30, 2011 12:02 pm

f="http://leftish.tumblr.com/post/15040041280/this-was-meant-to-be-the-first-post-ideological">“This was meant to be the first post ideological generation right?

This was meant to be the generation that never thought of anything bigger than our Facebook profiles and our TV screens. This was meant to be the generation where the only thing that Saturday night meant was X factor. I think now that claim is quite ridiculous. I think now that claim is quite preposterous. I think now we’ve shown that we are as ideological as ever before. Now we’ve shown that solidarity and comradeship and all those things that used to be associated with students are as relevant now as they’ve ever been.”

~ Barnaby Raine, 15 yr old, UK Student Activist, from a speech given at the “School Students Against the UK Tuition Hikes” Rally, November 2010

WATCH VIDEO

October 14, 2011 8:04 am