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July 28, 2013 7:16 pm
via OpEdNews.com
"A RAY OF HOPE FOR BRADLEY MANNING?
Many people have worried about the fate of Bradley Manning, a lone soldier who informed the world of war crimes being committed by the War Machine that has devoured the American republic and turned its ravaging, profit-reaping fury on the world.
As we all know, Manning is now in the iron grip of that Machine, facing the prospect of life in prison for his truth-telling, having already endured a long incarceration marked by episodes of relentless psychological torture. Many people quite reasonably dread what awaits Manning when the Military Court hands down its inevitable verdict against him.But wait — perhaps all is not lost after all. In the long dark night of our military imperium, a shaft of light, of hope, has suddenly appeared. And it comes from — of all places — the very pinnacle of the military justice system that is bearing down on Manning: The Court of Appeal of the Armed Forces of the United States. For it turns out that if a military prisoner has faced the least mistreatment during incarceration, even a temporary abuse of due process, then all charges against him will be dropped and he can walk free. And since Manning has manifestly faced any number of abuses of due process and egregious mistreatment, then we can be supremely confident that the military Court of Appeal — which enshrined this Solomonic principle in a recent case — will act with perfect consistency and release Bradley Manning in good time, whatever the eventual outcome of his current trial. After all, that’s what the Court has done for poor Lawrence Hutchins III, the good Marine who has been persecuted for years merely for carrying out his duty during America’s “extraordinary achievement” — as Barack Obama so aptly termed it — in ousting the dictator Saddam Hussein from power in Iraq. (It seems there were some other reasons adduced for the invasion back in the day — something sort of dubious? even spurious? — but thankfully, these have long been forgotten as America has put aside the petty squabbles of the past and returned once more to implacable sense of righteousness that wraps the nation’s every action in a golden, godly glow.) All Sgt. Hutchins did was lead his team on a night raid against a private home in the Iraqi town of Hamdania. All he and his team did was break into the house, grab an innocent retired policeman named Hashim Ibrahim Awad, drag him down the road to the site of a IED attack, tie him up, shoot him dead in cold blood, then dump his body in the IED hole, remove the plastic restraints, and leave a stolen AK-47 rifle next to the corpse to pretend Awad was a terrorist who had been killed in a firefight. That’s all Hutchins did. Oh yes, that, and have his men shoot Awad repeatedly in the face, in the hope of obliterating his identity. But family members recognized the body and demanded justice from their American military occupiers. Then came the real crime, the misdeed that would later lead the Court of Appeals of the Armed Forces of the United States to carry out its humanitarian intervention and set Hutchins free. As AP reports, Hutchins was arrested by the military brass and held “in solitary confinement without access to a lawyer for seven days during his 2006 interrogation in Iraq.” Thus Hutchins — who was facing a term of 11 whole years for kidnapping an innocent man, shooting him in the face then covering up the crime — was released from custody last month by the Court of Appeals, which cited the six-day spell in solitary as the basis for overturning his conviction. Who knew that the American military justice system was so fiercely adherent to due process that it would even let a killer go free on a “technicality,” like a bunch of wimpy ACLU lawyers? Who knew they would act with such exemplary exactitude in applying letter of the law down to the last jot and tittle? Yet this is the principle they have firmly established with their ruling on Hutchins: the failure to safeguard a military prisoner’s full panoply of legal rights in every respect must result in the overturning of any subsequent verdict against that prisoner, and his release from captivity. I think we can all rest easier knowing that this principle will now be guiding the decisions of the U.S. military justice system from now on. For surely it will be applied universally, not only to Bradley Manning but also to, say, the captives in Guantanamo Bay, who are subject to the same military justice system. Surely, it cannot be that this strict adherence to the legal niceties will only be applied in cases where an American soldier has brutally murdered some worthless towelhead in some piece-of-sh*t foreign hellhole we had to invade for some reason or another a long time ago, so who cares anyway.  No, surely, that cannot be. For as our recent history clearly shows, the operators of our War Machine always adhere strictly and consistently to the highest and most noble principles, applying them to all equally, the great and the low, without fear or favor, or the slightest hypocrisy. So Bradley Manning has nothing to worry about! Right? “

via OpEdNews.com

"A RAY OF HOPE FOR BRADLEY MANNING?

Many people have worried about the fate of Bradley Manning, a lone soldier who informed the world of war crimes being committed by the War Machine that has devoured the American republic and turned its ravaging, profit-reaping fury on the world.

As we all know, Manning is now in the iron grip of that Machine, facing the prospect of life in prison for his truth-telling, having already endured a long incarceration marked by episodes of relentless psychological torture. Many people quite reasonably dread what awaits Manning when the Military Court hands down its inevitable verdict against him.

But wait — perhaps all is not lost after all. In the long dark night of our military imperium, a shaft of light, of hope, has suddenly appeared. And it comes from — of all places — the very pinnacle of the military justice system that is bearing down on Manning: The Court of Appeal of the Armed Forces of the United States. 

For it turns out that if a military prisoner has faced the least mistreatment during incarceration, even a temporary abuse of due process, then all charges against him will be dropped and he can walk free. And since Manning has manifestly faced any number of abuses of due process and egregious mistreatment, then we can be supremely confident that the military Court of Appeal — which enshrined this Solomonic principle in a recent case — will act with perfect consistency and release Bradley Manning in good time, whatever the eventual outcome of his current trial. 

After all, that’s what the Court has done for poor Lawrence Hutchins III, the good Marine who has been persecuted for years merely for carrying out his duty during America’s “extraordinary achievement” — as Barack Obama so aptly termed it — in ousting the dictator Saddam Hussein from power in Iraq. (It seems there were some other reasons adduced for the invasion back in the day — something sort of dubious? even spurious? — but thankfully, these have long been forgotten as America has put aside the petty squabbles of the past and returned once more to implacable sense of righteousness that wraps the nation’s every action in a golden, godly glow.) 

All Sgt. Hutchins did was lead his team on a night raid against a private home in the Iraqi town of Hamdania. All he and his team did was break into the house, grab an innocent retired policeman named Hashim Ibrahim Awad, drag him down the road to the site of a IED attack, tie him up, shoot him dead in cold blood, then dump his body in the IED hole, remove the plastic restraints, and leave a stolen AK-47 rifle next to the corpse to pretend Awad was a terrorist who had been killed in a firefight. That’s all Hutchins did. Oh yes, that, and have his men shoot Awad repeatedly in the face, in the hope of obliterating his identity. But family members recognized the body and demanded justice from their American military occupiers. 

Then came the real crime, the misdeed that would later lead the Court of Appeals of the Armed Forces of the United States to carry out its humanitarian intervention and set Hutchins free. As AP reports, Hutchins was arrested by the military brass and held “in solitary confinement without access to a lawyer for seven days during his 2006 interrogation in Iraq.” Thus Hutchins — who was facing a term of 11 whole years for kidnapping an innocent man, shooting him in the face then covering up the crime — was released from custody last month by the Court of Appeals, which cited the six-day spell in solitary as the basis for overturning his conviction. 

Who knew that the American military justice system was so fiercely adherent to due process that it would even let a killer go free on a “technicality,” like a bunch of wimpy ACLU lawyers? Who knew they would act with such exemplary exactitude in applying letter of the law down to the last jot and tittle? Yet this is the principle they have firmly established with their ruling on Hutchins: the failure to safeguard a military prisoner’s full panoply of legal rights in every respect must result in the overturning of any subsequent verdict against that prisoner, and his release from captivity. 

I think we can all rest easier knowing that this principle will now be guiding the decisions of the U.S. military justice system from now on. For surely it will be applied universally, not only to Bradley Manning but also to, say, the captives in Guantanamo Bay, who are subject to the same military justice system. Surely, it cannot be that this strict adherence to the legal niceties will only be applied in cases where an American soldier has brutally murdered some worthless towelhead in some piece-of-sh*t foreign hellhole we had to invade for some reason or another a long time ago, so who cares anyway.  

No, surely, that cannot be. For as our recent history clearly shows, the operators of our War Machine always adhere strictly and consistently to the highest and most noble principles, applying them to all equally, the great and the low, without fear or favor, or the slightest hypocrisy. 

So Bradley Manning has nothing to worry about! 

Right? “

September 27, 2012 5:32 pm

VIDEO: JULIAN ASSANGE ADDRESSES THE UNITED NATIONS - 9/26/12

[NOTE* from Leftish: I’m just curious - did you see this covered on any of the Cable News Shows today?]

September 26, 2012 5:43 pm
BREAKING: US calls Assange 'Enemy of State'

Brisbane Times, AUSTRALIA

September 27, 2012

THE US military has designated Julian Assange and WikiLeaks as enemies of the United States - the same legal category as the al-Qaeda terrorist network and the Taliban insurgency.

Declassified US Air Force counter-intelligence documents, released under US freedom-of-information laws, reveal that military personnel who contact WikiLeaks or WikiLeaks supporters may be at risk of being charged with “communicating with the enemy”, a military crime that carries a maximum sentence of death.


Assange remains holed up in Ecuador’s embassy in London. He was granted diplomatic asylum on the grounds that if extradited to Sweden to be questioned about sexual assault allegations, he would be at risk of further extradition to the US to face espionage or conspiracy charges arising from the leaking of hundreds of thousands of secret US military and diplomatic reports.

US Vice-President Joe Biden labelled Assange a “high-tech terrorist” in December 2010 and US congressional leaders have called for him to be charged with espionage.

Sarah Palin and Mike Huckabee - both once involved in presidential campaigns - have both urged that Assange be “hunted down”.

Assange’s US attorney, Michael Ratner, said the designation of WikiLeaks as an “enemy” had serious implications for the WikiLeaks publisher if he were to be extradited to the US, including possible military detention.

US Army private Bradley Manning faces a court martial charged with aiding the enemy - identified as al-Qaeda - by transmitting information that, published by WikiLeaks, became available to the enemy.


Read more: http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/opinion/political-news/us-calls-assange-enemy-of-state-20120927-26m7s.html#ixzz27csZSFCS

April 28, 2012 1:18 pm
Bradley Manning Judge won't toss WikiLeaks case

Manning’s lawyers had sought dismissal of all 22 charges, contending prosecutors had failed their duty to share information that could be helpful to the defense, a legal process called discovery.

Lind agreed that prosecutors had wrongly assumed the discovery rules didn’t pertain to classified information but she found no evidence of prosecutorial misconduct, turning down the motion to throw out the case.



Read more: http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2012/04/25/MNMD1O8VH7.DTL#ixzz1tEq2qPrN

April 27, 2012 11:20 am
Bradley Manning Judge Warns Military Prosecutors in WikiLeaks Case
Judge refuses to dismiss most serious charge but tells prosecution it must prove private knew he was aiding the enemy.
The military judge in the court-martial of the US soldier accused of handing WikiLeaks the biggest trove of unauthorised state secrets in American history has put army prosecutors on notice that they must prove Bradley Manning knew he was helping the enemy or face the possibility that the most serious charge against him be dismissed.
Colonel Denise Lind refused to throw out the charge – “aiding the enemy” – as had been requested by Manning’s defence lawyers. But she told the military prosecution that during the trial, now scheduled for the end of September, that they would have to prove that the intelligence analyst was fully aware that he was helping the enemy when he allegedly handed hundreds of thousands of secret US documents to WikiLeaks.
Aiding the enemy is the most serious in the list of 22 charges that have been brought against Manning. It carries a maximum penalty of life in prison.
The trial will start on 21 September and is expected to last three weeks. It is certain to be closely followed in America and around the world, both by those who see Manning as a traitor to his country and military superiors, and by those who believe he was a hero who is being punished for being a whistleblower.
In seeking dismissal of the most serious offense, defense attorney David Coombs had argued that the charge did not properly allege that Manning intended to help al-Qaida when he allegedly sent hundreds of thousands of classified Iraq and Afghanistan war reports and state department diplomatic cables to the anti-secrecy website WikiLeaks.
Manning stated in an online chat with a confidant-turned-informant that he leaked the information because “I want people to see the truth”.
Prosecutors had argued that Manning knew the enemy would see the material when it appeared on WikiLeaks, regardless of his intentions.
Manning hasn’t entered a plea to any of the charges. He also hasn’t yet decided whether he will be tried by a judge or a jury.
Earlier Thursday, Lind rejected a motion to consolidate some charges that the defense said were duplicative. She said the defense could raise the motion again for sentencing purposes if Manning is convicted.
READ ENTIRE ARTICLE…

Bradley Manning Judge Warns Military Prosecutors in WikiLeaks Case

Judge refuses to dismiss most serious charge but tells prosecution it must prove private knew he was aiding the enemy.

The military judge in the court-martial of the US soldier accused of handing WikiLeaks the biggest trove of unauthorised state secrets in American history has put army prosecutors on notice that they must prove Bradley Manning knew he was helping the enemy or face the possibility that the most serious charge against him be dismissed.

Colonel Denise Lind refused to throw out the charge – “aiding the enemy” – as had been requested by Manning’s defence lawyers. But she told the military prosecution that during the trial, now scheduled for the end of September, that they would have to prove that the intelligence analyst was fully aware that he was helping the enemy when he allegedly handed hundreds of thousands of secret US documents to WikiLeaks.

Aiding the enemy is the most serious in the list of 22 charges that have been brought against Manning. It carries a maximum penalty of life in prison.

The trial will start on 21 September and is expected to last three weeks. It is certain to be closely followed in America and around the world, both by those who see Manning as a traitor to his country and military superiors, and by those who believe he was a hero who is being punished for being a whistleblower.

In seeking dismissal of the most serious offense, defense attorney David Coombs had argued that the charge did not properly allege that Manning intended to help al-Qaida when he allegedly sent hundreds of thousands of classified Iraq and Afghanistan war reports and state department diplomatic cables to the anti-secrecy website WikiLeaks.

Manning stated in an online chat with a confidant-turned-informant that he leaked the information because “I want people to see the truth”.

Prosecutors had argued that Manning knew the enemy would see the material when it appeared on WikiLeaks, regardless of his intentions.

Manning hasn’t entered a plea to any of the charges. He also hasn’t yet decided whether he will be tried by a judge or a jury.

Earlier Thursday, Lind rejected a motion to consolidate some charges that the defense said were duplicative. She said the defense could raise the motion again for sentencing purposes if Manning is convicted.

READ ENTIRE ARTICLE…

March 28, 2012 12:24 pm
New Australian Laws Specifically Target Wikileaks

As Julian Assange tilts at the Senate, new laws have been passed that will make it harder for organisations like Wikileaks to operate legally - and there are more to come, writes Matthew da Silva

The Labor Government is tightening up Australian law in areas that will have a direct impact on organisations such as WikiLeaks. Only the Greens are challenging the new bills in parliament, and they are receiving scant media attention.

There’s a new extradition law that will make it easier for foreign governments to request extradition of Australians and a new spying law that broadens ASIO’s reach, which has been dubbed the WikiLeaks Amendment.

And finally there’s a bill that will make it easier to retain digital data for Australians, and easier also to pass that information to overseas law enforcement agencies. Senator Scott Ludlam, the Greens’ spokesperson for communications, told New Matilda that the Attorney-General wants all digital records for all people for all time to be trapped and recorded so that intelligence agencies, law enforcement agencies, and welfare agencies can mine the data.

READ ENTIRE ARTICLE…

March 19, 2012 5:46 pm
Bradley is a true hero.  He did an extremely brave thing, and his actions inspire me to try and be brave, too.
The least we can do is have the courage to support him.  I know, it’s scary to even click on a link, because we all know that Big Brother is truly watching our every move…so that is why it is even more important that we all have to stick together, because there is safety in numbers…that’s our greatest tool - our numbers..
Who knows what we can do, if we put our minds together?

Bradley is a true hero.  He did an extremely brave thing, and his actions inspire me to try and be brave, too.

The least we can do is have the courage to support him.  I know, it’s scary to even click on a link, because we all know that Big Brother is truly watching our every move…so that is why it is even more important that we all have to stick together, because there is safety in numbers…that’s our greatest tool - our numbers..

Who knows what we can do, if we put our minds together?

March 17, 2012 1:30 pm

f="http://leftish.tumblr.com/post/19469589935/staff-sgt-robert-bales-slayer-of-innocent-civilians">Staff Sgt. Robert Bales, slayer of innocent civilians sent to same Kentucky Prison that tortured Bradley Manning.

Bales went berserk in Afghanistan, killing 16 innocent people…Bradley Manning’s crime was REPORTING the slaying of innocent people!

What do you think?  Will they make Staff Sgt. Bales spend most of his time naked, without a blanket?  Will they wake Staff Sgt. Bales up every five minutes to make sure he’s alive because they’ve determined that he is “suicidal”, as they did with Private Manning?  Will they keep Staff Sgt Bales in solitary for 23 hours a day?

Or is Whistleblowing on a Government that illegally kills innocent people looked upon with more hatred than a soldier who just does it directly?

March 1, 2012 6:58 pm
[NOTE* from Leftish: Have you HEARD about this?  Judge “sides with Monsanto”: WHISTLEBLOWERS are committing the crime?? 
NEWS FLASH!   Monsanto cash helped fund bill to stifle whistleblowers in Iowa!  WTF??]
“Speaking of Monsanto, it turns out they are playing a role in Iowa’s proposed anti-whistleblower bill – a bill focused primarily on agriculture. Should the bill pass, it will become illegal to produce undercover videos at various types of agricultural facilities (as well as to get a job at a facility with the express intent of producing a video). Sarah Damian of the Government Accountability Project, a “whistleblower advocacy organization,” observes over at the Food Integrity Campaign’s blog that Monsanto has been throwing lobbying dollars behind Iowa’s effort to draw a steel curtain around food production. And not without reason:

… Monsanto has more facilities in Iowa than in any other state in the country, with more than 25 offices. The company is heavily invested in the bill’s outcome because “crop operations” are also covered, which would apply to Monsanto’s seed houses, pesticide manufacturing plants and research facilities throughout Iowa. The biotech and crop chemical giant wouldn’t want any undercover videos produced on its clock, apparently.
That’s a bit ironic, however, given the fact that Monsanto investigators are notorious for trespassing on farmers’ property and going to extreme measures to produce evidence of seed patent infringement, including posing as land mappers or even joining a local Alcohol Anonymous group to gain the farmers’ trust and gain video access to their fields. Talk about undercover.

And don’t think that Monsanto hasn’t planned ahead. According to Damian, there are provisions in the bill that would allow Monsanto to continue snooping around farmers’ fields in its ongoing search for so-called “seed thieves” aka ‘patent infringers.’”
READ ENTIRE ARTICLE…

[NOTE* from Leftish: Have you HEARD about this?  Judge “sides with Monsanto”: WHISTLEBLOWERS are committing the crime?? 

NEWS FLASH!   Monsanto cash helped fund bill to stifle whistleblowers in Iowa!  WTF??]

Speaking of Monsanto, it turns out they are playing a role in Iowa’s proposed anti-whistleblower bill – a bill focused primarily on agriculture. Should the bill pass, it will become illegal to produce undercover videos at various types of agricultural facilities (as well as to get a job at a facility with the express intent of producing a video). Sarah Damian of the Government Accountability Project, a “whistleblower advocacy organization,” observes over at the Food Integrity Campaign’s blog that Monsanto has been throwing lobbying dollars behind Iowa’s effort to draw a steel curtain around food production. And not without reason:

… Monsanto has more facilities in Iowa than in any other state in the country, with more than 25 offices. The company is heavily invested in the bill’s outcome because “crop operations” are also covered, which would apply to Monsanto’s seed houses, pesticide manufacturing plants and research facilities throughout Iowa. The biotech and crop chemical giant wouldn’t want any undercover videos produced on its clock, apparently.

That’s a bit ironic, however, given the fact that Monsanto investigators are notorious for trespassing on farmers’ property and going to extreme measures to produce evidence of seed patent infringement, including posing as land mappers or even joining a local Alcohol Anonymous group to gain the farmers’ trust and gain video access to their fields. Talk about undercover.

And don’t think that Monsanto hasn’t planned ahead. According to Damian, there are provisions in the bill that would allow Monsanto to continue snooping around farmers’ fields in its ongoing search for so-called “seed thieves” aka ‘patent infringers.’”

READ ENTIRE ARTICLE…

January 22, 2012 8:24 pm

f="http://leftish.tumblr.com/post/16335035928/how-bradley-mannings-fate-will-be-decided">How Bradley Manning’s Fate Will Be Decided

The soldier accused of giving files to WikiLeaks will likely face a court-martial — an expert explains how it works.

This week, Bradley Manning came one step closer to being tried for allegedly leaking a trove of secret American cables to WikiLeaks when a military officer made the formal recommendation that Manning should face a court-martial on 22 criminal charges.

One of the counts, aiding the enemy, carries the possibility of the death penalty, but prosecutors have already said they will not seek it in Manning’s case.

The recommendation this week was made to Maj. Gen. Michael Linnington, commander of the Military District of Washington, who is what is known as the convening authority in the case. The military justice system has important differences from the civilian system, so I spoke to Eugene R. Fidell, who teaches military justice at Yale Law School, to explain the basics.

We’ve now had the investigating officer as well as another officer this week recommend a court-martial to the Military District of Washington commander. What’s the next step?

December 21, 2011 12:07 pm

f="http://leftish.tumblr.com/post/14575337632/i-kinda-cant-believe-how-little-reblogs-any-post-i">I kinda can’t believe how little reblogs any post I make about Bradley Manning gets…

I figure folks are afraid to even put their name on anything that might draw the attention of the Government….’cause I can’t believe my politically-engaged followers just DON’T CARE about Bradley Manning.

Be assured, if you follow me, you are probably already being watched!

It’s like doing a search on Sep 11.  Every time I research that subject I am aware that my IP address has been harvested (yet again), and I am being watched merely because I am curious about what REALLY happened that day.

So, please stay engaged with the Manning Trial - he needs our support.  He knowingly gave up his own security when he submitted those papers to Wikileaks.  He is a courageous hero who needs our support.

December 19, 2011 11:50 am

HEY!!  PLEASE WATCH THIS VIDEO: GRAHAM NASH AND JAMES RAYMOND’ST RIBUTE TO BRADLEY MANNING

[NOTE* from Leftish: I can’t stress enough how important Bradley Manning is to the entire planet, on so many levels!  His case demonstrates how clearly our government has been corrupted since the days when Whistleblower, Daniel Ellsberg was hailed as a hero for exposing wrongdoing in the Nixon Administration. Manning’s case represents Freedom of Speech, Cruel and Unusual Punishment, Anti-Gay Discrimination in the Military, as well as our Government’s willingness to shoot the messenger rather than fix the problem of wrongdoing that they are so desperately trying to cover up.

Bradley Manning’s actions inspired Mohamed Bouazizi, the Tunisian Fruit Vendor, who set himself on fire, which inspired the Arab Spring…and the Arab Spring inspired the Occupy Movement…so in my opinion, Bradley Manning is at the heart of it all - in fact, the world might not be in the current situation if not for him, so I heartily encourage you to watch this amazing video, for Bradley’s sake.]

"Truth is the first casualty of war." so begins this powerful video in support of Bradley Manning, with photos of him, rallies in his support and injured Iraqi civilians.

 When anyone asks me, ‘Who started Occupy Wall Street?’ sometimes I say ‘Goldman Sachs’ or ‘Chase’ but mostly I just say, ‘Bradley Manning.’ It was his courageous action that was the tipping point — and it was not surprising when the dictator of Tunisia censored all news of the Wikileaks documents Manning had allegedly supplied. But the internet took Manning’s gift and spread it throughout Tunisia, a young man set himself on fire and the Arab Spring that led eventually to Zuccotti Park has a young, gay soldier in the United States Army to thank.” ~ Michael Moore

December 16, 2011 12:15 am
FRIDAY, 12-16-11: BRADLEY MANNING’S ARTICLE 32 HEARING
SATURDAY, 12-17-11: BRADLEY MANNING’S 24TH BIRTHDAY
"The people should prosecute, but not Bradley Manning.  He’s accused of letting the truth out.  He’s not accused of any criminal activity. He’s accused of letting the truth out and he should be given an award for that, not prosecuted. He’s facing the death penalty potentially. He’s facing the death penalty for exposing war crimes!"
~ Kevin Zeese, Attorney with the Bradley Manning Support Network
The Guardian: What is likely to transpire at BRADLEY MANNING’S ARTICLE 32 HEARING
Donate to FireDogLake’s Coverage of Bradley Manning’s Article 32 Hearing

FRIDAY, 12-16-11: BRADLEY MANNING’S ARTICLE 32 HEARING

SATURDAY, 12-17-11: BRADLEY MANNING’S 24TH BIRTHDAY

"The people should prosecute, but not Bradley Manning.  He’s accused of letting the truth out.  He’s not accused of any criminal activity. He’s accused of letting the truth out and he should be given an award for that, not prosecuted. He’s facing the death penalty potentially. He’s facing the death penalty for exposing war crimes!"

~ Kevin Zeese, Attorney with the Bradley Manning Support Network

The Guardian: What is likely to transpire at BRADLEY MANNING’S ARTICLE 32 HEARING

Donate to FireDogLake’s Coverage of Bradley Manning’s Article 32 Hearing

December 15, 2011 5:10 pm

f="http://leftish.tumblr.com/post/14286711728/bradley-mannings-trial-starts-on-friday">Bradley Manning’s Trial Starts on Friday

I wrote a post about Keven Gosztola, of Firedoglake, needing donations so he can COVER BRADLEY MANNING’S TRIAL THIS FRIDAY, which has been heavily STACKED in favor of the Government.  38 of the 48 witnesses for the Defense are NOT BEING ALLOWED TO TESTIFY!!

The Government is ONLY ALLOWING THEIR OWN WITNESSES to be questioned by Manning’s Lawyers, and not allowing ANY of Manning’s 38 witnesses to speak.

THIS IS A VERY IMPORTANT TRIAL - OUR FREEDOM OF SPEECH IS BEING QUESTIONED, and Bradley faces LIFE IMPRISONMENT OR POSSIBLE EXECUTION!

Daniel Ellsberg is considered a HERO for doing a very similar action to what Bradley is accused of doing.

Bradley’s lawyer is arguing that the trial is tainted because the President said that Manning was guilty of committing a crime, seven months before Bradley was even charged.

He needs our help and support.

August 10, 2011 2:27 pm
WORDS OF WISDOM FROM MALCOLM X.
Bradley Manning, Julian Assange, Lt. Dan Choi have all been oppressed by this “Democratic” White House, and vilified for standing up to the US Government, and exposing its lies and inconsistencies. There are so many more individuals who have been painted as traitors for calling out our Government and caring enough to demand that the U.S. live up to the ideals upon which it was founded.
The level of oppression in our supposedly “free” society is a constant threat to the whole policy of Whistleblowing and speaking truth to power. It takes more and more courage to act when you know that your very life is threatened, just by telling or demanding the truth about the actions of our Government which is supposedly “of, by and FOR the PEOPLE”.
I know that by even tagging this post with “wikileaks” and “#julian assange”, I am probably subjecting myself to scrutiny, if not something much worse.
Be careful reading this, the curse might rub off on you, too.
That’s fucked up.

WORDS OF WISDOM FROM MALCOLM X.

Bradley Manning, Julian Assange, Lt. Dan Choi have all been oppressed by this “Democratic” White House, and vilified for standing up to the US Government, and exposing its lies and inconsistencies. There are so many more individuals who have been painted as traitors for calling out our Government and caring enough to demand that the U.S. live up to the ideals upon which it was founded.

The level of oppression in our supposedly “free” society is a constant threat to the whole policy of Whistleblowing and speaking truth to power. It takes more and more courage to act when you know that your very life is threatened, just by telling or demanding the truth about the actions of our Government which is supposedly “of, by and FOR the PEOPLE”.

I know that by even tagging this post with “wikileaks” and “#julian assange”, I am probably subjecting myself to scrutiny, if not something much worse.

Be careful reading this, the curse might rub off on you, too.

That’s fucked up.

(Source: notinmybrain, via 8intrepid8)